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    Statcare Removes Ticks
    How to remove a tick? 1024 576 Statcare Urgent Medical Care

    How to remove a tick?

    Bites from ticks, esp. deer ticks (Ixodes species) causes Lyme’s disease, a zoonotic disease. Lyme’s disease is caused by an infection with Borrelia burgdorferi esp. if the tick remains attached for more than 48-72 hours. Tick removal is relatively easy.

    How to remove a tick?

    1. Using tweezers, grasp the tick near the mouth parts, as close to the skin as possible.
    2. Pull the tick in a steady, upward motion away from skin.
    3. Do not use kerosone, matches or petroleum jelly to remove tick.
    4. Disinfect site with soap and water or hydrogen peroxide.
    5. Record date and location of tick bite.
    6. Dispose a live tick by submersing it in alcohol, placing it in a sealed bag, wrapping it tightly in tape or flushing it down the toilet. Never crush a tick with your fingers.

    What to do with the tick you removed?

    You can take it to the Department of Health and have it tested for the diseases it is carrying.

    Or

    You can get rid of the tick by:

    1. First drowning it in soapy water or rubbing alcohol and
    2. Flushing it down the toilet or throwing it in the trash after wrapping it up securely with tape.
    Lyme's disease, Tick bite
    Protect Yourself Against Lyme Disease This Summer 800 536 Statcare Urgent Medical Care

    Protect Yourself Against Lyme Disease This Summer

    As the weather warms up, you and your family will probably be spending more time enjoying the great outdoors. After all, the summer brings more opportunities for you to camp, hike, swim and bike. Before going outside, though, be sure to protect yourself from Lyme disease this summer.

    In 2015, 95% of confirmed Lyme disease cases were reported from 14 states: Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia and Wisconsin.

    What is Lyme disease?

    Lyme disease is caused by bacteria called Borrelia burgdorferi and is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected blacklegged ticks. Typical symptoms include fever, headache, fatigue, and a characteristic skin rash called erythema migrans.If left untreated, the infection can spread to joints, the heart, and the nervous system. Lyme disease is diagnosed based on symptoms, physical findings (e.g., rash), and the possibility of exposure to infected ticks; laboratory testing is helpful if used correctly and performed with validated methods. Most cases of Lyme disease can be treated successfully with a few weeks of antibiotics.

    What can you do to protect yourself?

    You can decrease the chances of being bitten by a tick with a few precautions.

    1. Avoid tick infested areas. This is especially important in May, June and July. Many local health departments and park or extension services will have information regarding these areas.
    2. If you are in a tick-infested area, walk in the center of trails to avoid contact with overgrown grass.
    3. Use insect repellent. Spray repellent containing a 20%-30% concentration of DEET on clothes and on exposed skin.
    4. You can also treat clothes (especially pants, socks and shoes) with permethrin, which kills ticks on contact. Do not use permethrin directly on skin.
    5. Permethrin can also be used on tents and some camping gear.
    6. Always check for ticks after being outdoors, even in your own yard.
    7. Remove attached ticks with tweezers. Avoid crushing the tick’s body. Grasp the tick firmly and as close to the skin as possible. Cleanse the area with an antiseptic.
    8. Bathe or shower as soon as possible after coming indoors (preferably within 2 hours) to wash off and more easily find ticks that are crawling on you.
    9. After being outdoors, dry clothing in a hot dryer for 10 minutes to kill any ticks that are attached to clothing.

    Source: CDC

    If you think that you may be ill from a tick bite, you should see a healthcare provider to diagnose your illness. Statcare Urgent Medical Care is a great option for tick prevention advice, Lyme Disease testing and treatment. No appointment is necessary at our clinics and you’ll only wait minutes to be seen. You can call ahead at (917) 310-3371  and let us know you’re on the way or you can check in online.

    agressive dog
    Dealing With Dog Bites 640 426 Statcare Urgent Medical Care

    Dealing With Dog Bites

    According to the CDC, approximately 4.5 million dog bites occur in the United States every year, and 900,000 of those bites become infected. Victims of dog bites frequently know the dog that attacked them. The head and neck are the most common site of bites in children up to age 10 years, probably because a child’s head is close to the level of a large dog’s mouth. The arms and legs, particularly the right hand, are the most frequent site of injury for older children and adults. A dog bite can lead to a range of injuries, including scratches, deep open cuts, puncture wounds, crush injuries, and tearing away of a body part. Dog bites rarely cause death.

    After being bitten by a dog, it is important to quickly and carefully clean the wound thoroughly with soap and a large amount of water; this can help to prevent infection. If there is bleeding, a clean towel or gauze should be pressed to the wound to slow or stop the bleeding.

    Do I need treatment? — Adults or children who have been bitten by a dog should see a healthcare provider if:

    ●An animal bite has broken through the skin and bleeding does not stop after applying pressure for 15 minutes

    ●A bone may be broken, or if there is other serious injury

    ●A bite victim has diabetes, liver disease, cancer, HIV-infection, or takes a medication that could weaken the immune system

    It is best to be evaluated and treated as soon as possible after being bitten to reduce the chance of developing an infection.

    The most common complication of a dog bite is infection. Antibiotics are generally recommended to prevent infection in people with high-risk wounds, facial wounds, wounds involving a bone or joint, and for people with other health problems, such as a weakened immune system or diabetes, which could increase the risk of serious infection.

    Tetanus is a serious, potentially life-threatening infection that can be transmitted by an animal or human bite. If you are not up-to-date with your tetanus vaccine, you will need a booster.

    If you were bitten by a dog that could be infected with rabies, you MUST seek medical attention to determine if a series of injections is needed to prevent rabies, which is usually a fatal illness.

    Walk-in to any of our clinics and talk to our providers. No appointment is necessary at our clinics and you’ll only wait minutes to be seen. You can call ahead at (917) 310-3371  and let us know you’re on the way or you can check in online.

    Source: CDCUpToDate

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