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    injury

    Signs Of A Concussion
    How To Tell If You Have A Concussion 1000 667 Sandeep Jain, MD

    How To Tell If You Have A Concussion

    A concussion is an injury to the brain. A concussion results from a sudden hit or a blow to the head. Concussions can also occur when the head suddenly jolts back and forth. Up to 3.8 million concussions occur each year in the United States. The most common causes of these injuries include car accidents, sports injuries, and falls.

    The signs of a concussion may not be visible at first. Signs may not appear until up to 48 hours later. It is possible to experience a concussion and not know it. Many people believe that a concussion involves unconsciousness, however, that is not always true. In fact, most concussions do not involve a loss of consciousness.

    Not recognizing the signs of a concussion can have serious consequences. The damage from a concussion is sometimes still present 30 years or later.

     

    How To Tell If You Have A Concussion

    Are you wondering how to tell if you have a concussion? Here are some signs that you should never ignore.

     

    Confusion

    Experiencing confusion or feeling as though one is in fog is a serious symptom of a concussion. If you or someone you love seems confused after a fall or hit to the head, then it is important to seek medical help right away.

     

    Trouble Walking

    Balance problems or difficulty walking is another sign of a concussion that you should not ignore. These problems occur in about 30 percent of people who suffer a concussion.

     

    Vomiting

    Many people experience nausea and vomiting following a concussion. However, this could be the sign of a more serious neurological injury. Therefore, you should always take vomiting serious after a head injury.

     

    Unusual Behavior

    It is important to be on the lookout for strange or bizarre behavior after a head injury. If a person becomes agitated or restless after being hit in the head or suffering an accident, then it is important to get concussion testing right away.

     

    Severe Headache

    Headaches are quite common with head injuries. They usually begin within seven days after an injury and can last months. Usually, these get better with rest. A severe headache should be checked out right away especially if the headache is worsening.

     

    Convulsions or Seizures

    Convulsions or seizures are a sign of a serious head injury. A seizure could indicate bleeding in the brain. Therefore, you should never ignore seizures. If you’ve had a seizure after suffering from a head injury, get concussion testing right away.

     

    What To Do For A Concussion

    It is important to get medical help for a head injury even if it does not seem serious. Ignoring the signs of a concussion can lead to memory and other problems down the road. Getting help quickly can also rule out more serious neurological problems.

    Most people fully recover from concussions. However, the quicker you get treatment, the better the chance of a full recovery. At Statcare, we provide BrainScope EEG concussion testing. BrainScope concussion tests measure brain function after a head injury. BrainScope has received more than $32 million dollars by the United States Department of Defense for research. The company has also received awards from the NFL and GE.

    Most insurance plans cover concussion screening tests at Statcare. If you are wondering how to tell if you have a concussion, visit one of our locations today or schedule your appointment online.

    Urgent Care For Elderly People
    What To Do If You Fall? 1024 576 Statcare Urgent Medical Care

    What To Do If You Fall?

    Whether you’re at home or somewhere else, a sudden fall can be startling and upsetting. Falls are the most common cause of injury among those aged 65 and over. 50% of falls occur at home.

    1. Remain calm and determine if you are hurt. Take several deep breaths.
    2. Roll over slowly and try to sit up.
    3. Look for the nearest sturdy furniture.
    4. Kneel if you can, getting up on one knee at a time.
    5. Then, stand up using your stronger leg, and use the sturdy furniture for support.
    6. Turn carefully, and sit down.
    7. If you cannot get up: Call for help. If you are alone, crawl slowly towards the telephone and call 911 or relatives. It is important to keep at least one phone where it can be reached from the floor.
    8. Treat all falls as serious! A fall can be a symptom of a serious issue. Schedule an appointment with your healthcare provider.

    Walk-in to any of our clinics and schedule a consultation. No appointment is necessary at our clinics and you’ll only wait minutes to be seen. You can call ahead at (917) 310-3371  and let us know you’re on the way or you can check in online.

    Statcare Treats Concussions From Falls
    5 First Aid Tips For A Suspected Fracture 1024 683 Statcare Urgent Medical Care

    5 First Aid Tips For A Suspected Fracture

    Whether you are playing a sport or rock climbing, if someone around you gets injured and you suspect it might be a fracture, it is important to act promptly. By following the correct steps before seeking help, you can avoid further injury. Before getting the person to our urgent care center, follow the pointers below.

      1. Don’t move the person. If the individual looks like they have sustained a major injury, do not move them at all. You would be risking displacing the bone even more than it already is.

     

      1. Immobilize the fractured limb. As you wait to transport the person to our urgent care center, do what you can to keep the injured body part in place. If you or someone nearby is trained in first aid, apply a splint to the arm or leg.

     

      1. Apply ice. Prevent swelling by applying ice directly to the injured area. Wrap an ice pack or bag of ice in a towel and hold it gently to the skin.

     

    1. Look for other injuries. As you stabilize the patient, scan their body for other injuries. Apply pressure to any bleeding and notice any bruising.
    2. If you can, lay the person down with their head slightly lower than the rest of their body and elevate their legs.

    CALL 911 IF THE PERSON:

    • Is bleeding uncontrollably
    • Has a numb, cold, pale, or blue ankle/foot
    • Is unable to move the foot
    • Is in shock (faint, pale, with rapid shallow breathing)

    Stop by any of our clinics to talk to our healthcare providers. We offer in-house xrays.  Please call us at (917) 310-3371  and you’ll only wait minutes to be seen.

    laceration example showing stitches
    Do I Need Stitches? Find Out How To Tell 1024 768 Statcare Urgent Medical Care

    Do I Need Stitches? Find Out How To Tell

    What is a laceration?

    Lacerations are cuts on the skin. While incisions are cuts produced by a sharp object such as glass or a razor, lacerations are blunter and irregular.  Not all lacerations need stitches. In fact, small lacerations can be cared for right at home.

    Home Care

    Small lacerations can be cleaned at home and covered with a clean gauze and tape if they fit the following criteria:

    • the bleeding stops in 10 minutes or less.
    • the cut is not on the face (especially on the mouth or near the eyes).
    • the cut is small and not very deep (not more than 1/4 inch deep).

    If your wound does not fit this description, you might need stitches. Stitches are not only necessary to stop the bleeding, but they also help speed up healing and prevent infections. Your risk of infection increases the longer the wound remains open. Most wounds that require closure should be stitched, stapled or closed with skin adhesives within 6 to 8 hours after the injury. Some wounds that require treatment can be closed as long as 24 hours after the injury.

    If you have diabetes, chronic kidney failure or a suppressed immune system, your wounds might not heal as fast or as well as other people, so you might need stitches even if it is a small laceration. When in doubt, come to any of our clinics and speak to our health care providers.

    Getting Stitches

    Sutures (or stitches) are the most common method used to close up a laceration. Non-dissolvable sutures made of nylon or polypropylene material are used to close the outer layer of wounds. Dissolvable sutures made of polyglycolic and polygalactic acid are used to close deeper layers of skin and tissue.

    Signs that a cut requires stitches:

    • Deep enough to exposure the yellow subcutaneous fatty tissue, muscle or bone.
    • Gaping open so that you can’t easily use gentle pressure to press the edges together.
    • Located on or across a joint (concern for damaged nerves, tendons/ligaments).
    • The result of an animal or human bite.
    • A result of a foreign body impaling the area.
    • Made by a high-pressure impact from a projectile like a bullet.
    • Contaminated or resulting from a very dirty or rusty object.
    • Bleeding profusely.
    • On a cosmetically significant area, such as the face, lips, eyelids.
    • On or near the genitalia.

    You may also need a tetanus vaccine booster.

    Removal of Stitches

    Most stitches are removed within 10 days and as soon as five days in areas like the face, where the blood supply is rich – which makes healing faster. The longer the stitches are left in, the higher the risk of scarring. The main goal of stitches is to help your wound heal, so if they need to stay in place for a longer period of time, the health care provider may choose to do that. Stitches are easy to remove with surgical scissors. After the stitches are removed, the area will be examined by the healthcare provider to ensure that it’s healing properly and that it is properly closed. Although you might be tempted to remove the stitches at home, it’s safer if you return to the clinic for this. It’s easy to re-injure the area – or even cause an infection -if you’re not careful. This will result in a feeling of general illness, and may require antibiotics for you to get well.

    Walk-in to any of our clinics and talk to our providers. No appointment is necessary at our clinics and you’ll only wait minutes to be seen. You can call ahead at (917) 310-3371  and let us know you’re on the way or you can check in online.

    Sources: CDCCleveland Clinic

    alcohol glass
    What is excessive alcohol use? 7 strategies to help you cut back or stop drinking! 1024 576 Statcare Urgent Medical Care

    What is excessive alcohol use? 7 strategies to help you cut back or stop drinking!

    Drinking too much alcohol increases your risk of injuries, violence, drowning, liver disease and some types of cancer.This April during Alcohol Awareness Month, Statcare Urgent Medical Care encourages you to educate yourself and your loved ones about the dangers of drinking too much. 

    To spread the word and prevent alcohol abuse in our community, Statcare Urgent Medical Care is joining other organizations across the country to honor Alcohol Awareness Month.

    What is excessive alcohol use?

    Excessive drinking includes:

    • Binge drinking: For women, binge drinking is 4 or more drinks consumed on one occasion (one occasion = 2-3 hours). For men, binge drinking is 5 or more drinks consumed on one occasion.
    • Underage drinking: Any alcohol use by those under age 21.
    • Heavy drinking: For women, heavy drinking is 8 drinks or more per week. For men, heavy drinking is 15 drinks or more per week.
    • Pregnant drinking: Any alcohol use by pregnant women

    What is considered a “drink”?

    U.S. standard drink sizes:

    • 12 ounces of 5% ABV beer
    • 8 ounces of 7% ABV malt liquor
    • 5 ounces of 12% ABV wine
    • 1.5 ounces of 40% ABV (80-proof) distilled spirits or liquor (examples: gin, rum, vodka, whiskey)

    If you choose to drink, do so in moderation.

    • No one should begin drinking or drink more frequently based on potential health benefits
    • Up to 1 drink a day for women
    • Up to 2 drinks a day for men
    • Don’t drink at all if you are under age 21, pregnant or may be pregnant, or have health problems that could be made worse by drinking

    If you are drinking too much, you can improve your health by cutting back or quitting.

    In a 2014 study of alcohol dependence among US adult drinkers, CDC researchers found that from 2006 through 2010, excessive alcohol consumption accounted for nearly 1 in 10 deaths among working-age US adults aged 20-64.

    Here are some strategies to help you cut back or stop drinking:

    1. Limit your drinking to no more than 1 drink a day for women or 2 drinks a day for men.
    2. Keep track of how much you drink.
    3. Choose a day each week when you will not drink.
    4. Don’t drink when you are upset.
    5. Limit the amount of alcohol you keep at home.
    6. Avoid places where people drink a lot.
    7. Make a list of reasons not to drink.

    If you are concerned about someone else’s drinking, offer to help.

    New York City has many free and low-cost services for those who wish to quit drinking. You can call New York City’s 24-hour-a-day, seven-day-a-week hotline at 1-888-NYC-WELL (1-888-692-9355) or visit NYC Well online.

    Walk-in to any of our clinics and talk to our providers. No appointment is necessary at our clinics and you’ll only wait minutes to be seen. You can call ahead at (917) 310-3371  and let us know you’re on the way or you can check in online.

    SourceCDC

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