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    Can-Strokes-Be-Prevented
    Can Strokes Be Prevented? 1000 667 Sandeep Jain, MD

    Can Strokes Be Prevented?

    May is National Stroke Awareness Month and we’d like to shine the spotlight on stroke prevention. A common question that patients ask us is “can a stroke be prevented?”

    Stroke, also known as a cerebrovascular accident (CVA), is currently the fifth leading cause of death in the United States. It is a medical emergency. What is surprising is that most strokes are preventable. In fact, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), as many as 80 percent of all CVAs can be prevented with the right lifestyle changes.

    Risk Factors

    The first step in preventing cerebrovascular accidents is to know the risk factors. There are certain things that make a person more likely to have a stroke, such as:

    • Genetics. If your parent, brother, or sister had a CVA, you are more likely to have one too.
    • Age. The risk increases as you age.
    • Diet. Diets that are high in saturated fats and cholesterol increase the risk of stroke as they raise blood cholesterol levels. Cholesterol is a fatty substance in the blood that clogs arteries. The buildup of cholesterol in the arteries blocks blood flow to the brain resulting in a CVA. Consequently, eating a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol can reduce the risk.
    • Smoking. The nicotine and carbon monoxide present in cigarette smoke damage the cardiovascular system — hence, smokers have an increased risk of CVAs.
    • Using birth control pills. Taking certain kinds of birth control pills increases the risk of stroke. As a matter of fact, the risk is highest for women who take birth control pills and smoke.
    • Physical inactivity. A lack of physical exercise is linked with an increased risk of stroke.
    • Obesity. Obesity is related to other risk factors that likewise increase the risk of cerebrovascular accidents, such as elevated cholesterol and high blood pressure. Therefore, people who are obese are more likely to have a cerebrovascular accident.

    Signs Of A Stroke

    The next step in preventing strokes is to be aware of the signs. Some of these symptoms can occur with other illnesses, as well. If you are experiencing any of the below symptoms, it is important to call 911 or seek medical treatment right away. Acting quickly is the key to recovery from a CVA. Here are some signs to be on the lookout for:

    • Speech problems – Slurred or garbled speech.
    • Sudden confusion that comes on quickly – Trouble understanding what others are saying.
    • Trouble seeing or dimming – Vision problems that arise quickly in one or both eyes.
    • Difficulty walking – Difficulty walking, dizziness, or a loss of coordination.
    • Severe headache – A bad headache that occurs for no reason.
    • Numbness or weakness – Weakness or numbness on one side of the body only.

    Why Acting Quickly Is Important

    Getting treatment immediately for a stroke can help save lives. Treatments have improved greatly over the last several decades. Researchers now know that the brain can recover after a stroke. However, time is the key. Waiting too long to get help reduces the likelihood of recovery and diminishes the long-term prognosis greatly. Therefore, see a doctor even if you are in doubt about the symptoms.

    Schedule an appointment or visit an urgent care near me to talk to a doctor about your risk today. We can help you identify ways to lower the likelihood of a cerebrovascular accident. Always remember to go to the emergency room or call 911 if you believe that you are having a stroke.

    Urgent Care Pre-Diabetes Screening
    Prediabetes Screening: How and Why? 1024 683 Statcare Urgent Medical Care

    Prediabetes Screening: How and Why?

    Prediabetes is a condition in which blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not quite high enough to be diagnosed as type 2 diabetes. 1 in 3 U.S. adults have prediabetes. Most don’t know know it. Having prediabetes means that you are at an increased risk of developing serious health problems such as type 2 diabetes, stroke and heart disease.

    You could have prediabetes if you have:

    • high cholesterol
    • high blood pressure
    • a parent, brother or sister with diabetes

    Your risk goes up if you are overweight, and/or over age 45.

    The Science of Prediabetes

    Insulin is a hormone made in the pancreas and released into the bloodstream. When the body breaks down carbohydrates from the food we eat into glucose, also known as blood sugar, insulin helps the body’s cells absorb the glucose and use it for energy.

    If the cells that respond to insulin lose sensitivity, a condition known as insulin resistance develops. When people have insulin resistance, although the body still produces insulin, it is not used effectively, causing glucose to build up in the blood instead of being absorbed by cells. This increase in blood glucose leads to prediabetes, and eventually type 2 diabetes, if left untreated.

    The American Diabetes Association recommends one of the 3 screening tests to diagnose prediabetes:

    1. Hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) test
    2. Fasting plasma glucose (FPG) test
    3. Oral glucose tolerance (OGTT) test

    We offer all 3 screening tests to diagnose prediabetes at our clinics. No appointment is necessary and you’ll only wait minutes to be seen. You can call ahead at (917) 310-3371
     and let us know you’re on the way or you can check in online.

    Lyme's disease, Tick bite
    Protect Yourself Against Lyme Disease This Summer 800 536 Statcare Urgent Medical Care

    Protect Yourself Against Lyme Disease This Summer

    As the weather warms up, you and your family will probably be spending more time enjoying the great outdoors. After all, the summer brings more opportunities for you to camp, hike, swim and bike. Before going outside, though, be sure to protect yourself from Lyme disease this summer.

    In 2015, 95% of confirmed Lyme disease cases were reported from 14 states: Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia and Wisconsin.

    What is Lyme disease?

    Lyme disease is caused by bacteria called Borrelia burgdorferi and is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected blacklegged ticks. Typical symptoms include fever, headache, fatigue, and a characteristic skin rash called erythema migrans.If left untreated, the infection can spread to joints, the heart, and the nervous system. Lyme disease is diagnosed based on symptoms, physical findings (e.g., rash), and the possibility of exposure to infected ticks; laboratory testing is helpful if used correctly and performed with validated methods. Most cases of Lyme disease can be treated successfully with a few weeks of antibiotics.

    What can you do to protect yourself?

    You can decrease the chances of being bitten by a tick with a few precautions.

    1. Avoid tick infested areas. This is especially important in May, June and July. Many local health departments and park or extension services will have information regarding these areas.
    2. If you are in a tick-infested area, walk in the center of trails to avoid contact with overgrown grass.
    3. Use insect repellent. Spray repellent containing a 20%-30% concentration of DEET on clothes and on exposed skin.
    4. You can also treat clothes (especially pants, socks and shoes) with permethrin, which kills ticks on contact. Do not use permethrin directly on skin.
    5. Permethrin can also be used on tents and some camping gear.
    6. Always check for ticks after being outdoors, even in your own yard.
    7. Remove attached ticks with tweezers. Avoid crushing the tick’s body. Grasp the tick firmly and as close to the skin as possible. Cleanse the area with an antiseptic.
    8. Bathe or shower as soon as possible after coming indoors (preferably within 2 hours) to wash off and more easily find ticks that are crawling on you.
    9. After being outdoors, dry clothing in a hot dryer for 10 minutes to kill any ticks that are attached to clothing.

    Source: CDC

    If you think that you may be ill from a tick bite, you should see a healthcare provider to diagnose your illness. Statcare Urgent Medical Care is a great option for tick prevention advice, Lyme Disease testing and treatment. No appointment is necessary at our clinics and you’ll only wait minutes to be seen. You can call ahead at (917) 310-3371  and let us know you’re on the way or you can check in online.

    Urgent Care Treats Heart Attacks
    Warning signs of a Heart Attack 1024 576 Statcare Urgent Medical Care

    Warning signs of a Heart Attack

    Don’t wait to get help if you experience any of these heart attack warning signs. Although some heart attacks are sudden and intense, most start slowly, with mild pain or discomfort. Pay attention to your body — and call 911 if you feel:

    1. Pain or discomfort in chest
    2. Lightheadedness, nausea or vomiting
    3. Jaw, neck or back pain
    4. Discomfort or pain in arm or shoulder
    5. Shortness of breath

    Act Fast

    Learn the signs, but remember this: Even if you’re not sure it’s a heart attack, have it checked out. Minutes matter! Fast action can save lives — maybe your own. Don’t wait – call 911 or your emergency response number.

    diabetes
    The ABCs of diabetes 922 720 Statcare Urgent Medical Care

    The ABCs of diabetes

    What can I do to stay as healthy as possible if I have diabetes? — If you have diabetes (sometimes called diabetes mellitus), the most important thing you can do is to control your “ABCs”:

    ●”A” stands for “A1C” – A1C is a blood test that shows what your average blood sugar level has been during the last few months.

    ●”B” stands for “blood pressure” – If you have diabetes, controlling your blood pressure is just as important as controlling your blood sugar. High blood pressure puts you at risk for heart attack, stroke, and kidney disease.

    ●”C” stands for “cholesterol” – Cholesterol is a waxy substance found in the blood. High cholesterol is another factor that increases your risk of heart attacks, strokes, and other serious problems.

    Why are my ABCs so important? — Compared with people who do not have diabetes, people who have diabetes are 2 to 3 times more likely to have a heart attack or a stroke. People with diabetes also have heart attacks at a younger age, and that are more severe and more deadly. Plus, people with diabetes are much more likely to get kidney disease. By keeping your ABCs under control, you can lower your risk of these problems by a lot.

    Stop by any of our clinics to get your blood pressure checked as well as get your A1C and cholesterol levels checked.

     

    Note: Cholesterol levels are accurate when drawn after fasting for at least 8-12 hours. Drinking water is allowed.

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    Hicksville, NY 11801

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    Astoria, NY 11105

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     932 East 174th Street
    Bronx, NY 10460

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    Bronx, (Bartow)

     2063A Bartow Avenue
    Bronx, NY 10475

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     341 Eastern Parkway
    Brooklyn, NY 11216

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