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    Signs Of A Concussion
    How To Tell If You Have A Concussion 1000 667 Sandeep Jain, MD

    How To Tell If You Have A Concussion

    A concussion is an injury to the brain. A concussion results from a sudden hit or a blow to the head. Concussions can also occur when the head suddenly jolts back and forth. Up to 3.8 million concussions occur each year in the United States. The most common causes of these injuries include car accidents, sports injuries, and falls.

    The signs of a concussion may not be visible at first. Signs may not appear until up to 48 hours later. It is possible to experience a concussion and not know it. Many people believe that a concussion involves unconsciousness, however, that is not always true. In fact, most concussions do not involve a loss of consciousness.

    Not recognizing the signs of a concussion can have serious consequences. The damage from a concussion is sometimes still present 30 years or later.

     

    How To Tell If You Have A Concussion

    Are you wondering how to tell if you have a concussion? Here are some signs that you should never ignore.

     

    Confusion

    Experiencing confusion or feeling as though one is in fog is a serious symptom of a concussion. If you or someone you love seems confused after a fall or hit to the head, then it is important to seek medical help right away.

     

    Trouble Walking

    Balance problems or difficulty walking is another sign of a concussion that you should not ignore. These problems occur in about 30 percent of people who suffer a concussion.

     

    Vomiting

    Many people experience nausea and vomiting following a concussion. However, this could be the sign of a more serious neurological injury. Therefore, you should always take vomiting serious after a head injury.

     

    Unusual Behavior

    It is important to be on the lookout for strange or bizarre behavior after a head injury. If a person becomes agitated or restless after being hit in the head or suffering an accident, then it is important to get concussion testing right away.

     

    Severe Headache

    Headaches are quite common with head injuries. They usually begin within seven days after an injury and can last months. Usually, these get better with rest. A severe headache should be checked out right away especially if the headache is worsening.

     

    Convulsions or Seizures

    Convulsions or seizures are a sign of a serious head injury. A seizure could indicate bleeding in the brain. Therefore, you should never ignore seizures. If you’ve had a seizure after suffering from a head injury, get concussion testing right away.

     

    What To Do For A Concussion

    It is important to get medical help for a head injury even if it does not seem serious. Ignoring the signs of a concussion can lead to memory and other problems down the road. Getting help quickly can also rule out more serious neurological problems.

    Most people fully recover from concussions. However, the quicker you get treatment, the better the chance of a full recovery. At Statcare, we provide BrainScope EEG concussion testing. BrainScope concussion tests measure brain function after a head injury. BrainScope has received more than $32 million dollars by the United States Department of Defense for research. The company has also received awards from the NFL and GE.

    Most insurance plans cover concussion screening tests at Statcare. If you are wondering how to tell if you have a concussion, visit one of our locations today or schedule your appointment online.

    Urgent Care Headaches Strokes
    Learn to identify the signs of a stroke. Act F.A.S.T! 1024 695 Statcare Urgent Medical Care

    Learn to identify the signs of a stroke. Act F.A.S.T!

    A stroke occurs when blood supply to the brain is cut off or when a blood vessel bursts. Stroke kills more than 130,000 Americans each year—that’s 1 out of every 20 deaths. Someone in the United States has a stroke every 40 seconds. A stroke can cause lasting brain damage, long-term disability, or even death.

    If you think that you or someone else is having a stroke, call 911 immediately.
     All the major symptoms of stroke appear suddenly, and often there is more than one symptom at the same time. With timely treatment, the risk of death and disability from stroke can be lowered. By knowing the signs and symptoms of stroke, you can be prepared to take quick action and perhaps save a life—maybe even your own.

    Take a few minutes to learn the five major signs and symptoms of a stroke:

    • Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, arms, or legs
    • Sudden confusion or trouble speaking or understanding others
    • Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes
    • Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, or loss of balance or coordination
    • Sudden severe headache with no known cause

    If you think someone may be having a stroke, act F.A.S.T and do the following simple test:

    F—Face: Ask the person to smile. Does one side of the face droop?

    A—Arms: Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward?

    S—Speech: Ask the person to repeat a simple phrase. Is their speech slurred or strange?

    T—Time: If you observe any of these signs, call 9-1-1 immediately.

    Note the time when any symptoms first appear. Some treatments for stroke only work if given in the first 3 hours after symptoms appear. Do not drive to the hospital or let someone else drive you. Call an ambulance so that medical personnel can begin life-saving treatment on the way to the emergency room.

    Source: CDC

    Lyme's disease, Tick bite
    Protect Yourself Against Lyme Disease This Summer 800 536 Statcare Urgent Medical Care

    Protect Yourself Against Lyme Disease This Summer

    As the weather warms up, you and your family will probably be spending more time enjoying the great outdoors. After all, the summer brings more opportunities for you to camp, hike, swim and bike. Before going outside, though, be sure to protect yourself from Lyme disease this summer.

    In 2015, 95% of confirmed Lyme disease cases were reported from 14 states: Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia and Wisconsin.

    What is Lyme disease?

    Lyme disease is caused by bacteria called Borrelia burgdorferi and is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected blacklegged ticks. Typical symptoms include fever, headache, fatigue, and a characteristic skin rash called erythema migrans.If left untreated, the infection can spread to joints, the heart, and the nervous system. Lyme disease is diagnosed based on symptoms, physical findings (e.g., rash), and the possibility of exposure to infected ticks; laboratory testing is helpful if used correctly and performed with validated methods. Most cases of Lyme disease can be treated successfully with a few weeks of antibiotics.

    What can you do to protect yourself?

    You can decrease the chances of being bitten by a tick with a few precautions.

    1. Avoid tick infested areas. This is especially important in May, June and July. Many local health departments and park or extension services will have information regarding these areas.
    2. If you are in a tick-infested area, walk in the center of trails to avoid contact with overgrown grass.
    3. Use insect repellent. Spray repellent containing a 20%-30% concentration of DEET on clothes and on exposed skin.
    4. You can also treat clothes (especially pants, socks and shoes) with permethrin, which kills ticks on contact. Do not use permethrin directly on skin.
    5. Permethrin can also be used on tents and some camping gear.
    6. Always check for ticks after being outdoors, even in your own yard.
    7. Remove attached ticks with tweezers. Avoid crushing the tick’s body. Grasp the tick firmly and as close to the skin as possible. Cleanse the area with an antiseptic.
    8. Bathe or shower as soon as possible after coming indoors (preferably within 2 hours) to wash off and more easily find ticks that are crawling on you.
    9. After being outdoors, dry clothing in a hot dryer for 10 minutes to kill any ticks that are attached to clothing.

    Source: CDC

    If you think that you may be ill from a tick bite, you should see a healthcare provider to diagnose your illness. Statcare Urgent Medical Care is a great option for tick prevention advice, Lyme Disease testing and treatment. No appointment is necessary at our clinics and you’ll only wait minutes to be seen. You can call ahead at (917) 310-3371  and let us know you’re on the way or you can check in online.

    HTN, High BP, High blood pressure, SBP, DBP, systolic, diastolic
    What are the symptoms of high blood pressure? 640 473 Statcare Urgent Medical Care

    What are the symptoms of high blood pressure?

    What is blood pressure?

    Blood pressure is the amount of force that our blood puts on our artery walls as it moves through our body. Arteries are blood vessels that carry blood from our heart to the rest of our body. When our heart beats, it pushes our blood through our arteries. As the blood moves, it puts pressure on our artery walls. This is called our blood pressure.

    What is high blood pressure?

    High blood pressure (also called hypertension) occurs when our blood moves through our arteries at a higher pressure than normal. There are many causes of high blood pressure. High blood pressure can damage many parts of the body. If one has high blood pressure, it increases risk of stroke, heart disease, heart attack and kidney failure. Controlling one’s blood pressure can reduce these risks.

    What are the symptoms of high blood pressure?

    If you are looking for a list of symptoms and signs of high blood pressure, you won’t find them here. This is because most of the time, there are none. High blood pressure is a largely symptom-less “silent killer.” If you ignore your blood pressure because you think a certain symptom or sign will alert you to the problem, you are taking a dangerous chance with your life.

    • In most cases, high blood pressure does not cause headaches or nosebleeds.
    • Blood spots in the eyes (subconjunctival hemorrhage) are more common in people with diabetes or high blood pressure, but neither condition causes the blood spots. Floaters in the eyes are also not related to high blood pressure.
    • Facial flushing occurs when blood vessels in the face dilate. It can occur unpredictably or in response to certain triggers such as sun exposure, cold weather, spicy foods, wind, hot drinks and skin-care products. Facial flushing can also occur with emotional stress, exposure to heat or hot water, alcohol consumption and exercise — all of which can raise blood pressure temporarily. While facial flushing may occur while your blood pressure is higher than usual, high blood pressure is not the cause of facial flushing.
    • While dizziness can be a side effect of some blood pressure medications, it is not caused by high blood pressure. However, dizziness should not be ignored, especially if the onset is sudden. Sudden dizziness, loss of balance or coordination and trouble walking are all warning signs of a stroke. High blood pressure is the leading risk factor for stroke.

    About 85 million Americans – one out of every three adults over age 20 – have high blood pressure. (Nearly 20% don’t even know they have it.) The best way to know if you have high blood pressure is to have your blood pressure checked.

    Walk-in to any of our clinics, get your blood pressure checked and talk to our providers. No appointment is necessary at our clinics and you’ll only wait minutes to be seen. You can call ahead at (917) 310-3371  and let us know you’re on the way or you can check in online.

    Source: AHA

    Statcare urgent care provides Malaria vaccines
    You can prevent carbon monoxide exposure 240 160 Statcare Urgent Medical Care

    You can prevent carbon monoxide exposure

    Daylight Savings Time begins Sunday, March 12, 2017. As you prepare to set your clocks ahead one hour, remember to check the batteries in your carbon monoxide (CO) detector. If you don’t have a battery-powered or battery back-up CO alarm, now is a great time to buy one. About 400 people die each year in the United States from unintentional, non-fire related CO poisoning.

    Carbon monoxide is formed when organic compounds burn. The most common sources are motor vehicle exhaust, smoke from fires, engine fumes, and nonelectric heaters. CO from these sources can build up in enclosed or partially enclosed spaces. People and animals in these spaces can be poisoned and can die from breathing CO.

    Symptoms of CO poisoning include headache, nausea, fatigue, dizziness, vomiting, chest pain and confusion.

    CO poisoning is entirely preventable. You can protect yourself and your family by acting wisely in case of a power outage and learning the symptoms of CO poisoning.

    How can I prevent CO poisoning in my home?

    1. Install a battery-operated or battery back-up CO detector in your home and check or replace the battery when you change the time on your clocks each spring and fall.

    2. Don’t run a car or truck inside a garage attached to your house, even if you leave the door open.

    3. Never burn anything in a stove or fireplace that isn’t vented.

    4. Never heat your house with a gas oven.

    5. Never use a generator, charcoal grill, camp stove, or other gasoline or charcoal-burning device inside your home, basement or garage or outside less than 20 feet from a window, door or vent.

    6. Have your heating system, water heater, and any other gas, oil, or coal burning appliances serviced by a qualified technician every year.

    Source: CDC

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