Things To Know About Mono (Kissing Disease)

by Statcare Urgent Medical Care

What is infectious mononucleosis?

Infectious mononucleosis, also known as mono or the "kissing disease," is an infection caused by Ebstein-Barr virus.

How did I get mono?

The virus can spread from person to person through contact with saliva. Thus, a person can be exposed to the virus by kissing, sharing eating utensils, or drinking from the same glass as a person who has mono. 

What are the symptoms?

  • Fever (temperature greater than 100.4ºF)
  • Fatigue
  • Sore throat
  • Enlarged lymph glands in the neck

Is mono ever dangerous?

The spleen is an organ in the left upper abdomen, just under the diaphragm. It becomes enlarged in about half of people with mono. If the spleen becomes enlarged, it is recommended avoiding contact sports or heavy lifting for a few weeks. This advice is given to avoid the rare complication of splenic rupture that can occur after trauma, but can also happen spontaneously.

How is mono diagnosed?

Mono may be suspected based upon a person's symptoms and physical examination. Blood tests are done to confirm the diagnosis. We also offer the in-house mono test at our clinics.

How is mono treated?
The goal of mono treatment is to ease the symptoms while the immune system contains the virus. Antibiotics are not helpful because mono is caused by a virus, and there are no antiviral medications that are known to effectively treat or cure Epstein-Barr virus. Symptomatic treatment is advised.

Walk-in to any of our clinics. No appointment is necessary at our clinics and you’ll only wait minutes to be seen. You can call ahead at (855) 9 FOR DOC and let us know you’re on the way or you can check in online.