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Back Pain? Watch out for these 8 Red-Flags

by Statcare Urgent Medical Care

About 80% of people have at least one episode of low back pain during their lifetime. Factors that increase the risk of developing low back pain include smoking, obesity, older age, physically strenuous work, sedentary work, a stressful job, job dissatisfaction and psychological factors such as anxiety or depression.

A common feature of low back pain is radiculopathy, which occurs when a nerve root is irritated by protruding disc or arthritis of the spine. Sciatica refers to the most common symptom of radiculopathy. It causes a sharp or burning pain that extends down the back or side of the thigh, usually to the foot or ankle. It is associated with tingling and numbness. Occasionally, sciatica may be associated with muscle weakness in the leg or the foot.

Red flag symptoms - you must seek immediate help:

  1. If you are 70 years or older with new back pain.
  2. Pain that does not go away, even at night or when lying down.
  3. Weakness in one or both legs or problems with bowel, bladder, or sexual function.
  4. If you have back pain accompanied by unexplained fever or weight loss.
  5. If you have a history of cancer, a weakened immune system, osteoporosis, or have used corticosteroids (eg, prednisone) for a prolonged period of time.
  6. If the back pain is a result of falling or an accident, especially if you are older than 50 years.
  7. If pain spreads into the lower leg, particularly if accompanied by weakness of the leg.
  8. If back pain does not improve within 4 weeks.

If you experience any of these symptoms, stop by any of our clinics. No appointment is necessary at our clinics and you’ll only wait minutes to be seen. We are open on weekends as well. You can call ahead at (855) 9 FOR DOC and let us know you’re on the way or you can check in online.


NY offers free colorectal cancer screening

by Statcare Urgent Medical Care

The New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) announced earlier this month that the number of New Yorkers getting screened for colon cancer has increased by more than 100,000 from 2014 to 2015. 

More than 9,000 New Yorkers are diagnosed with colorectal cancer every year and the disease claims nearly 3,000 lives each year. 

Screening for colorectal cancer is covered by most health plans, including Medicaid and health plans participating in NY State of Health, New York's official health plan marketplace. The NYSDOH Cancer Services Program (CSP) offers free screening to eligible uninsured men and women in every county and borough in New York. To find a CSP near you, call 1-866-442-CANCER (2262) or visit:

http://www.health.ny.gov/diseases/cancer/services/community_resources/ 

The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends initiating screening for colorectal cancer at age 50 years and continuing until age 75 years

Certain individuals at an increased or high risk of colorectal cancer should get screened before age 50 and/or should be screened more often. The following conditions make your risk higher than average:

  • A personal history of rectal cancer or adenomatous polyps.
  • A personal history of inflammatory bowel disease (ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease).
  • A strong family history of colorectal cancer or polyps.
  • A known family history of hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome such as familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) or Lynch syndrome (hereditary non-polyposis colon cancer or HNPCC).

Our goal at Statcare Urgent Medical Care is to reach 100% eligible patients.

Click here to read more about colorectal cancer.

Walk-in to any of our clinics and talk to our providers about getting screened. No appointment is necessary at our clinics and you’ll only wait minutes to be seen. You can call ahead at (855) 9 FOR DOC and let us know you’re on the way or you can check in online.


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Hicksville, New York

232 W. Old Country Road
Hicksville, NY 11801

(855) 9 FOR DOC

Monday – Friday: 8 am – 8 pm
Saturday – Sunday: 9 am – 5 pm
Holidays: 9 am – 3 pm

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Astoria, Queens

37-15 23rd Avenue
Astoria, NY 11105

(855) 9 FOR DOC

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Holidays: 9 am – 3 pm

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Bronx, NYC

932 East 174th Street
Bronx, NY 10460

(855) 9 FOR DOC

Monday – Friday: 8 am – 8 pm
Saturday – Sunday: 9 am – 3 pm
Holidays: 9 am – 3 pm

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Bronx, NYC

2063A Bartow Avenue
Bronx, NY 10475

(855) 9 FOR DOC

Monday – Friday: 8 am – 8 pm
Saturday – Sunday: 9 am – 3 pm
Holidays: 9 am – 3 pm

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Brooklyn

341 Eastern Parkway
Brooklyn, NY 11216

(855) 9 FOR DOC

Monday – Friday: 8 am – 10 pm
Saturday – Sunday: 9 am – 5 pm
Holidays: 9 am – 3 pm

Directions